Wonderful Wolverhampton

Wightwick Manor

The legacy of a romantic industrialist.

Wightwick Manor

Wightwick Bank
Wolverhampton
WV6 8EE

01902 761400

Wightwick Manor

Wightwick Manor offers a fascinating insight into a house influenced by William Morris and his contemporaries. Surrounding the house is a beautiful Edwardian garden full of textures and colours all year. Tea Room & Gift Shop also on site. 
 
This house of the Aesthetic Movement was, by 1937, a relic of an out of fashion era. Yet, so complete was the design that it was worthy of preservation. Having given the house to the Trust, Geoffrey and his second wife Rosalie became its live-in curators, opening the house to the public and adding to its contents. In particular they added a remarkable collection of Pre-Raphaelite paintings by Rossetti, Burne-Jones and their followers.
 
So take a step back in time and visit the ever-changing family home that’s also the world’s most unlikely art gallery. Surrounding the house is a beautiful Edwardian garden full of textures and colours all year. Tea Room & Gift Shop also on site.
 

Queen Mary Tree

In July 1900, when King George V and Queen Mary (then the Duke and Duchess of York) visited the Mander family at Wightwick Manor, there was only one photographer suitable to record the occasion.  Bennett Clark took the photos. Theodore Mander wasWightwick_Manor_-_Queen_Mary_Tree__letter.jpg the Mayor at the time.  The royal couple visited the Orphanage and the Duke unveiled the foundation stone of the Library. They planted trees at Wightwick (a purple-twigged lime by the Duke and a copper beech by the Duchess - now looking magnificent at the end of the south terrace garden) and then had a formal photo taken in front of the house. Fifty years later, in 1950, Sir Geoffrey sent Queen Mary cuttings from the trees along with  copies of the official photos from 1900 and a list of the people shown on the photos. Presumably the copies were taken by Bennett-Clark.
 

The reply from Queen Mary's Private Secretary (of which there is a copy on show at
Wightwick) states how Queen Mary remembered the day well and could recollect all of the people on the photo without the aid of Sir Geoffrey's list!  
Sir Geoffrey, duly sent this letter to Bennett Clark.  "The enclosed" is probably a cheque for Clark's charges for providing copies.
 
(Thanks to David Bennett for information on this event)